Checking in with Team Shaw’s Vet Clinic

Dr. Leland Raymond, 20th Medical Group veterinarian, gives “Stormie” her checkup in the vet clinic at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Feb. 6, 2018.

Dr. Leland Raymond, 20th Medical Group veterinarian, gives “Stormie” her checkup in the vet clinic at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Feb. 6, 2018. Getting annual checkups and shots can help pets live a longer and healthier life. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class BrieAnna Stillman)

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Constance Nicholsbingham, Fort Gordon Public Health noncommissioned officer in charge, works with Denise Wade 20th Medical Group animal health assistant, to insert a microchip into their patient at Shaw Air Force Base. S.C., Feb 7, 2018.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Constance Nicholsbingham, Fort Gordon Public Health noncommissioned officer in charge, works with Denise Wade, 20th Medical Group animal health assistant, to insert a microchip into their patient at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Feb 7, 2018. The Shaw vet clinic is able to conduct x-rays, ultrasounds and blood work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class BrieAnna Stillman)

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Constance Nicholsbingham, Fort Gordon Public Health noncommissioned officer in charge checks the military working dog training area at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Feb. 7, 2018.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Constance Nicholsbingham, Fort Gordon Public Health noncommissioned officer in charge, checks the military working dog training area at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Feb. 7, 2018. Nicholsbingham not only assists the vet clinic, but also ensures the living conditions of military working dogs are adequate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class BrieAnna Stillman.)

SHAW AIR FORCE BASE, S.C. -- Team Shaw not only takes care of people, but also their furry and scaly friends. The veterinary clinic at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina cares for many base animals, from military working dogs, personal pets and hamsters at the child development center.

While the clinic is primarily led by civilians, U.S. Soldiers like Staff Sgt. Constance Nicholsbingham, Fort Gordon Public Health noncommissioned officer in charge, come to the clinic two to three times a week to not only assist veterinarians, but also to check up on military working dogs and other animals on base.

“The Shaw kennels are some of the cleanest kennels I’ve seen in my whole military career, so security forces members do a great job,” said Nicholsbingham.

Part of Nicholsbingham’s job is to make sure the health and welfare of the animals assigned to Shaw is adequate by assessing animals and their living quarters.

Dr. Leland Raymond, 20th Medical Group veterinarian, said serving on base is more of an honor than serving off base because he gets to directly work with service members.

“I enjoy being able to serve folks who have given their own service and I’m able to do that by taking care of their animals,” said Raymond

Both Raymond and Nicholbingham want Team Shaw to know they are available and have the capabilities to perform x-rays, ultra sounds, blood work, lab work, implant microchips and hopefully will be able to conduct surgeries in the near future.

The clinic is open Monday through Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. They can be contacted at 803-895-6155.