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Emergency management, BEE conduct ‘rad’ training

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zaria Smith, left, Airman 1st Class Kailee Johnson, middle, and Airman Angelo Madrazo, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technicians, complete an eight-legged radiological survey at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Aug. 29, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zaria Smith, left, Airman 1st Class Kailee Johnson, middle, and Airman Angelo Madrazo, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technicians, complete an eight-legged radiological survey at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Aug. 29, 2018. The survey was part of the classroom portion of a joint radiological incident response training between emergency management and the 20th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Destinee Sweeney)

U.S. Airmen scan individuals going through a decontamination line for simulated radiation during a joint response training at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Aug. 29, 2018.

U.S. Airmen scan individuals going through a decontamination line for simulated radiation during a joint response training at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Aug. 29, 2018. The individuals going through the decontamination line had to remove personal protective gear without contaminating themselves with radiation after performing radiological surveys. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Destinee Sweeney)

A joint team comprised of U.S. Airmen from the 20th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management flight and the 20th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering flight walk in a straight line while searching for simulated radiation for an exercise survey at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Aug. 29, 2018.

A joint team comprised of U.S. Airmen from the 20th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management flight and the 20th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering flight walk in a straight line while searching for simulated radiation for an exercise survey at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Aug. 29, 2018. The team paused every few steps to scan for various types of radiation and reported via radio any radiation found. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Destinee Sweeney)

SHAW AIR FORCE BASE, S.C. -- The 20th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management flight and the 20th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering flight conducted joint radiological training, Aug. 29.

The units, which are responsible for responding to chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear incidents, practiced team skills, conducted refresher training and encouraged cohesion between the units.

Staff Sgt. Stefanie Nakoneczny-Wood, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of emergency management plans, said the joint training allows the flights to work out any kinks and ensure everyone is on the same page.

In the event of a radiological incident, emergency management would work along with BEE as well as other first responders to suit up, set up a decontamination line and run a survey for radiation.

“We just want to knock out any misunderstanding between flights since we’d be responding together anyways in a real-world situation,” said Nakoneczny-Wood.

The first portion of the training consisted of classroom instruction on radiation including detection equipment, safety gear and surveying technique.

During the hands-on training, teams comprised of both BEE and emergency management Airmen donned personal protective equipment and put together ADM-300 multi-functional survey meters. The squads then responded to a simulated radiological incident, surveying 360 degrees around the site and setting up a decontamination line.

“It does strengthen our relationship with emergency management,” said Airman 1st Class Bryanna Garcia, 20th AMDS BEE technician. “It helps us know who to get in contact with to plan further training, so we can be aware of who we’re working with so we’re not meeting them for the first time and it helps us plan for worst-case scenario.”

Team Shaw first responders collaborate to prepare for anything, anytime, anywhere. By training together, the units help form bonds between Airmen allowing for better communication and smoother processes in the event of an emergency.