HomeNewsArticle Display

Shaw shells out to Sumter

Chris Simon, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member smiles for a photo at the 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019.

Chris Simon, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member smiles for a photo at the 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019. Simon has been shooting with the ATA for two months as way to shoot on base where he can be safe and learn how to shoot at the same time. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlyn Brewer)

Mark Cordener, 20th Force Support Squadron (FSS) Trap and Skeet Range safety officer, marks scores during an Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) shoot, at the 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019.

Mark Cordener, 20th Force Support Squadron (FSS) Trap and Skeet Range safety officer, marks scores during an Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) shoot, at the 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019. The ATA has been shooting at Shaw for four years and has been bringing in countless civilians and volume, contributing to the range. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlyn Brewer)

Chris Simon, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member, aims his shotgun in preparation for a clay target at the 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019.

Chris Simon, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member, aims his shotgun in preparation for a clay target at the 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019. Shaw is one of the few installations to host the ATA and has been thriving from the relationship. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlyn Brewer)

Rodney Raines, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member, shoots at an orange clay target at the 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019.

Rodney Raines, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member, shoots at an orange clay target at the 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019. The ATA serves as the governing body for the sport of American style registered trapshooting and currently has 55,000 members worldwide. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlyn Brewer)

Mark Cordener, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member, 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range safety officer, shoots a clay target as part of a shooting event at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019.

Mark Cordener, Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA) member, 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range safety officer, shoots a clay target as part of a shooting event at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 4, 2019. Members who want to shoot at Shaw can join a club like the ATA to shoot for half the price. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlyn Brewer)

SHAW AIR FORCE BASE, S.C. -- With a swift motion a shooter’s shotgun barrel faced the sky, they load five shells, pump the shotgun and lift it to their shoulder shouting, “pull” as the range manager pushes a button to release a clay ‘bird’; the shooter breathes in slowly and squeezes the trigger.

The 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range works with local groups in the Sumter community, including the Amateur Trapshooting Association and Wilson Hall High School, among other active duty and civilian shooters, creating a positive reputation because of the relationships with the local community.

“ATA draws in more people and keeps us alive,” said Marty Long, 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range manager. “The civilian influence that we have and draw is enormous and has made all the difference.”

Steven Creech, Sumter’s previous mayor, frequents the 20th FSS Trap and Skeet range often, drawing in a wider audience for the range.

“A lot of civilians who come onto base have given their time, expertise and insight and because they go to a lot of different ranges, they help me build this place to customer satisfaction,” said Long.

The influx in attendees provided Long the revenue he needed to update the range. He was able to purchase a monitor to electronically log those who come in and shoot. Previously rotting storage units are now completely rebuilt and stocked. And per the recommendation of a customer they put their shooting machines on wheels in lieu of having to manually move them around. The 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range is now more prestigious and competitive with other ranges nearby.

The 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range allows civilians to have competitions and events like the father-daughter shooting event and to sponsor high schools without potential shooters having to drive an hour to the nearest range.

Not only is the range more convenient for civilians because of location but it has become cheaper for active duty members to shoot at. If a member signs up as part of the ATA they can shoot for half the price it would cost to shoot alone.
Active duty, along with members from the community are now shooting together at a more convenient and cost efficient range.

“I saw a billboard that said Trap and Skeet, so I came out here to try it since both my sons are gone to college,” said Chris Simon an Army veteran and ATA shooter. “I love being able to shoot on the base because then you don’t have a bunch of rowdy guys like you would off base. It’s so calm and peaceful and the range is very beautiful with the trees in the background.

The Trap and Skeet Range is one way for Shaw Airmen and the local community to come together and raise their shotguns to their shoulder and shout, “pull”.
With a swift motion a shooter’s shotgun barrel faced the sky, they load five shells, pump the shotgun and lift it to their shoulder shouting, “pull” as the range manager pushes a button to release a clay ‘bird’; the shooter breathes in slowly and squeezes the trigger.

The 20th Force Support Squadron Trap and Skeet Range works with local groups in the Sumter community, including the Amateur Trapshooting Association and Wilson Hall High School, among other active duty and civilian shooters, creating a positive reputation because of the relationships with the local community.

“ATA draws in more people and keeps us alive,” said Marty Long, 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range manager. “The civilian influence that we have and draw is enormous and has made all the difference.”

Steven Creech, Sumter’s previous mayor, frequents the 20th FSS Trap and Skeet range often, drawing in a wider audience for the range.

“A lot of civilians who come onto base have given their time, expertise and insight and because they go to a lot of different ranges, they help me build this place to customer satisfaction,” said Long.

The influx in attendees provided Long the revenue he needed to update the range. He was able to purchase a monitor to electronically log those who come in and shoot. Previously rotting storage units are now completely rebuilt and stocked. And per the recommendation of a customer they put their shooting machines on wheels in lieu of having to manually move them around. The 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range is now more prestigious and competitive with other ranges nearby.

The 20th FSS Trap and Skeet Range allows civilians to have competitions and events like the father-daughter shooting event and to sponsor high schools without potential shooters having to drive an hour to the nearest range.

Not only is the range more convenient for civilians because of location but it has become cheaper for active duty members to shoot at. If a member signs up as part of the ATA they can shoot for half the price it would cost to shoot alone.
Active duty, along with members from the community are now shooting together at a more convenient and cost efficient range.

“I saw a billboard that said Trap and Skeet, so I came out here to try it since both my sons are gone to college,” said Chris Simon an Army veteran and ATA shooter. “I love being able to shoot on the base because then you don’t have a bunch of rowdy guys like you would off base. It’s so calm and peaceful and the range is very beautiful with the trees in the background.

The Trap and Skeet Range is one way for Shaw Airmen and the local community to come together and raise their shotguns to their shoulder and shout, “pull”.