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20th OSS participates in orientation flights

Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, flies his aircraft over Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019.

Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, flies his aircraft over Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019. The flight allowed 20th Fighter Wing Airmen the opportunity to see the installation from the air while learning how pilots interact with the airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kathryn R.C. Reaves)

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, points out details on flight instruments while flying his aircraft near Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019.

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, points out details on flight instruments while flying his aircraft near Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019. Airmen assigned to the 20th Operations Support Squadron participated in CAP Orientation Flights, an initiative designed to give Airmen a deeper understanding of how they interact with the airspace and pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kathryn R.C. Reaves)

Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, watches aircraft traffic on the flightline while taxiing his aircraft at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019.

Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, watches aircraft traffic on the flightline while taxiing his aircraft at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019. Grooms provided 20th Operations Support Squadron Airmen flights to give them a deeper understanding of how they interact with the airspace and pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kathryn R.C. Reaves)

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, left, performs preflight checks before taxiing his aircraft while Airman 1st Class Gianna Suber-Green, 20th Operations Support Squadron airfield management specialist, observes at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019.

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Lt. Col. Brett Grooms, pilot, left, performs preflight checks before taxiing his aircraft while Airman 1st Class Gianna Suber-Green, 20th Operations Support Squadron airfield management specialist, observes at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019. Suber-Green participated in a CAP Orientation Flight with Grooms, discussing her observations to determine how she could work with pilots more efficiently. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kathryn R.C. Reaves)

A Civil Air Patrol (CAP) pilot navigates his aircraft while providing CAP Orientation Flights to 20th Operations Support Squadron Airmen at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019.

A Civil Air Patrol (CAP) pilot navigates his aircraft while providing CAP Orientation Flights to 20th Operations Support Squadron Airmen at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, July 12, 2019. Airmen participating in the flights watched pilots interact with equipment and learned how conditions, such as visibility, look from the pilot’s prospective. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kathryn R.C. Reaves)

SHAW AIR FORCE BASE, S.C. --

Newly trained Airmen assigned to the 20th Operations Support Squadron participated in a round of Civil Air Patrol Orientation Flights, July 12.

From opening the airfield to working on radios and controlling the airspace, 20th OSS Airmen are crucial to getting F-16 Vipers in the air, said 1st Lt. Abigail Reed, 20th OSS airfield operations trainee. By participating in the orientation flights, Airmen were able to see how pilots interact with equipment and how conditions, such as visibility, look from their perspective.

This, in addition to discussion with the CAP pilots, may in turn foster a deeper understanding of how the Airmen interact with the airspace and the pilots they serve.

Airman 1st Class Gianna Suber-Green, 20th OSS airfield management specialist, was one of the individuals selected for a CAP Orientation Flight.

“It was definitely cool to see our mission work while (I was) up in the air,” said Suber-Green. “Everything was super interesting. (It was) stuff I know from an airfield management standpoint, but it’s nice to hear the same things from a pilot’s standpoint. If you get this opportunity, definitely take advantage of it. … It’s so much fun and you learn so much information.”