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Central accumulation point and HAZMART turn waste to gain

Darryl Keith (left) and Rodney Greene, Shaw Air Force Base central accumulation point environmental technicians, move and inventory hazardous items so they can be properly documented and stored before being disposed of at Shaw AFB, S.C., Oct. 5, 2012. The central accumulation point recycles otherwise unusable materials, saving the environment and citizens from their toxic effects, while also creating revenue for the government by reusing the recycled materials. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Blackwell/Released)

Darryl Keith (left) and Rodney Greene, Shaw Air Force Base central accumulation point environmental technicians, move and inventory hazardous items so they can be properly documented and stored before being disposed of at Shaw AFB, S.C., Oct. 5, 2012. The central accumulation point recycles otherwise unusable materials, saving the environment and citizens from their toxic effects, while also creating revenue for the government by reusing the recycled materials. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Blackwell/Released)

Darryl Keith, Shaw Air Force Base central accumulation point environmental technician, uses the aerosol can puncturing machine to release the pressurized gas within an aerosol can before disposing of it at Shaw AFB, S.C., Oct. 5, 2012. Because aerosol cans operate using a pressurized gas system, they pose the threat of exploding when exposed to adverse conditions. This step is performed to reduce the risk to the environment and people. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Blackwell/Released)

Darryl Keith, Shaw Air Force Base central accumulation point environmental technician, uses the aerosol can puncturing machine to release the pressurized gas within an aerosol can before disposing of it at Shaw AFB, S.C., Oct. 5, 2012. Because aerosol cans operate using a pressurized gas system, they pose the threat of exploding when exposed to adverse conditions. This step is performed to reduce the risk to the environment and people. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Blackwell/Released)

SHAW AIR FORCE BASE, S.C. -- The central accumulation point and the HAZMART both play roles in base operations and mission success on Shaw by controlling and disposing of hazardous waste.

Essentially, what we do here at the CAP is properly dispose of hazardous waste or redistribute unused products that would be disposed of as hazardous waste once used, said Kimberly Binggeli, Shaw AFB CAP and HAZMART site manager.

"Anything that's hazardous, which is anything that's toxic to humans, flammable, corrosive or water-reactive comes to this facility," Binggeli explained. "The items are then placed into an inventory where they are properly tracked until the necessary documentation is completed and it can be disposed of."

The CAP takes all approved, properly labeled and stored hazardous waste, non-hazardous waste and universal waste. This includes civilians and dependants who have access to the base as well.

To ensure safety and efficiency the CAP organizes the hazardous materials that come in into categories. Each category or type of hazardous waste is stored and disposed of differently. Currently, there are four categories with associated storage and disposal regulations as follows: toxic, flammable, corrosive and water-reactive.

"A lot of what we have are typical waste streams that we see come through here all the time," explained Jenyfer Johnson, 20th Civil Engineer Squadron hazardous material and waste manager. "We see a lot of squadrons and units turn in paint after painting the jets, but we take many other forms of hazardous waste as well."

The CAP encourages Team Shaw to take advantage of the services they offer; this includes but is not limited to, the disposal of batteries (alkaline and or lithium), florescent lamps (cylinder tube lighting), as well as used oil and absorbents.

The HAZMART also gives base residents and entities the option to get rid of unused items that may no longer be needed.

"We also offer what we call shop and household free issue through the HAZMART," Binggeli said.

Shop free issue is any hazardous material(s) turned in by a shop on base that can no longer be used for their mission, but is still usable material(s). Once the material(s) is logged and accounted for, any shop that has use of the material(s) can have it for free.

The same concept applies for household items considered to be hazardous. These items may be turned in and stored for later use by anyone who needs them.

"When people PCS, we get a lot of the detergents, paints and aerosol cans or things that they can't ship," Binggeli explained.

Any items issued through the shop free issue or household free issue programs come with a material safety data sheet or MSDS. This sheet explains the hazards the product poses while in use, the proper protective gear that should be worn while using the product, and the proper way the product should be stored while not in use.

The HAZMART and CAP ensure that the environment, base residents and units, as well as the local Shaw community are protected from hazardous waste and its adverse effects.

"We ensure everything hazardous that comes on base, and leaves, is tracked from cradle to grave." Binggeli concluded.


For more information regarding the CAP, the HAZMART, and their services please call

HAZMART- (803)895-9932 or 9933

Central Accumulation Point- (803) 895-0120