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  • Resilient kids, ready Airmen

    One thing Airmen worry about when they deploy is the well-being of their family, especially children who may have a hard time coping with the challenges that come with a parent’s deployment. The impact of deployment on children is a key component of Airmen readiness. Knowing their family is well helps Airmen focus on the mission.
  • Good mental health critical to readiness

    Mental health is a critical part of every Airman’s medical readiness. Although many service members worry that seeking mental health care will negatively effect their career, the opposite is usually true. With early identification and the right treatment by a medical professional, most mental health issues get better quickly without any negative career impact.
  • Suicide Prevention Month raises awareness, promotes understanding

    Throughout September, organizations across the United States make efforts to raise awareness of a mental health issue affecting many demographics. During Suicide Prevention Month, organizations promote the understanding of suicide by providing information about how individuals can identify warning signs and how they can help themselves or others
  • Suicide prevention month: stopping suicide is everyone’s battle

    September is Suicide Prevention Month, a time for Americans to build awareness and help understand suicide in our culture. More than 40,000 Americans lose their life due to suicide each year and research shows that rates in the military and the general population are very close. The loss of any one person to suicide is a tragedy, and that is why
  • From reunion to reintegration

    As military members and their families reunite after a deployment or an extended separation, their resiliency, or ability to bounce back, is tested.
  • PTSD Awareness leads to positive treatment

    Post-traumatic Stress Disorder can be debilitating in some patients, but thanks to advancements in research and the continued training of mental health providers, treatments are getting better all the time.Maj. Joel Foster, Chief of Air Force Deployment Mental Health, said treating PTSD has improved dramatically in the last 20 years.“Twenty years
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